Tag Archives: venezuela

I Declare Myself President of the United States of America

I, Garry Leech, declare myself president of the United States of America. There I did it. I am now the leader of the most powerful nation on earth. “By what right?” you ask. By the right of the new democratic political process recently implemented in Venezuela and endorsed by the US government. This is how I am restoring democracy in the United States. In the same manner that the new self-declared president of Venezuela, Juan Guaidó, with the backing of the US government, is restoring democracy in Venezuela: through the ouster of a democratically elected leader.

Now I realize that most US Americans have never heard of me, but only one in four Venezuelans had heard of Guaidó before he declared himself president of Venezuela on January 22nd. And you might argue that I have never run for national office in the United States. But that didn’t stop Guaidó. Finally, you might declare that such a move on my part is unconstitutional. And you’d be correct. But that also didn’t prevent Guaidó from declaring himself president. Nor did it stop the United States, Canada and a handful of other imperialist nations from recognizing him. Apparently, democracy in the 21st century doesn’t require abiding by constitutions; nor does it require elections. And so, following the precedent established by Guaidó and his foreign backers, I unilaterally declare myself president of the United States as part of this new democratic order.

One thing that Guaidó does have going for him that I don’t at this point is foreign recognition of his self-declared presidency. But I intend to fix that by working covertly with the governments of Russia and China, as Guaidó did with the US government prior to his self-appointment, in order to obtain their support for my presidency. Once again, following the Venezuelan precedent, getting recognition from such powerful nations will mean that my presidency will be legitimate.

Of course, Russia and China will want something in return for recognizing me as president of the United States. Most likely they will want unfettered access to our country’s vast natural resources. The relationship between the new self-declared president of Venezuela and the United States has also established a precedent regarding such a quid pro quo. Less than a week after the Trump administration recognized Guaidó as the legitimate president of Venezuela, US National Security Advisor John Bolton stated, “We’re in conversation with major American companies now … It’ll make a big difference to the United States economically if we can have American oil companies really invest in and produce the oil capabilities in Venezuela.”

Naturally, it is not only my personal thirst for power and the desire of Russia and China to access our natural resources that are motivating factors behind my declaration as president and foreign support for our new democratic process. There is also the need for humanitarian intervention to end the suffering endured by so many US Americans.

Clearly, there exists a humanitarian crisis in the United States. A Harvard Medical School study revealed that 44,000 people die annually in the United States due to a lack of access to affordable health care. This number dwarfs the amount of deaths that have occurred in Venezuela during that country’s economic crisis. These needless deaths from lack of affordable health care are occurring in a country that spends $700 billion annually on its military. Furthermore, 23 percent of children in the world’s richest nation live in poverty, according to a report published by UNICEF. The report ranks the 35 most economically advanced nations in the world with regard to child poverty and the United States places 34th on the list.

The United States also incarcerates more of its own citizens than any other nation. With 2.3 million prisoners, the ‘land of the free’ has more people in prison than China, which has a population four times the size of the United States. A quarter of the 2.3 million prisoners are in jail for non-violent drug offenses. The racist policies of the US legal system are made evident by the fact that, despite constituting only 13 percent of the nation’s drug users, Blacks represent 58 percent of imprisoned drug offenders. Systemic racism isn’t restricted to incarceration, it is also apparent in the state violence that kills a hugely disproportionate number of black men every year on the streets of US cities.

In declaring myself president of the United States, I wish to exhibit a level of honesty that appears to be beyond Venezuela’s self-appointed president Guaidó and the US government. I openly admit that I don’t really give a damn about the humanitarian crisis in the United States and realize that my coup attempt (Oops! I mean democratic self-appointment as president) will likely worsen the situation for millions of US Americans. My foreign backers also have no interest in seriously addressing this humanitarian crisis. I simply want power for myself and my cronies, while my foreign supporters only have eyes for our natural resources. I believe that this new democratic process requires at least this degree of honesty and transparency.

So, as the new self-declared president of the United States, I ask you all to no longer recognize former president Donald Trump as the leader of our great nation because he has been discredited both domestically and internationally—thanks in large part to the mainstream media. And, in accordance with another precedent set by Guaidó in Venezuela, I call on the heroic members of the US Armed Forces to no longer obey former president Trump and to instead recognize me as their new commander-in-chief. In fact, in the name of democracy, I ask all citizens of the world to recognize me as the new legitimate president of the United States of America.

 

 

 

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Business As Usual: Washington’s Regime Change Strategy in Venezuela

For those who have been following Venezuela closely in recent years there is a distinct sense of déjà vu regarding US foreign policy towards that South American nation. This is because Washington’s strategy of regime change in Venezuela is almost identical to the approach it has taken in Latin America on many occasions since World War Two. This strategy involves applying economic sanctions, extensive support for the opposition, and destabilization measures that create a sufficient degree of human suffering and chaos to justify a military coup or direct US military intervention. Because this strategy has worked so well for the United States for more than half a century, our elected leaders see no reason not to use it regarding Venezuela. In other words, from Washington’s perspective, its regime change policies towards Venezuela constitute business as usual in Latin America. Continue reading


Behind the Lies About Venezuela’s Protests

US Secretary of State John Kerry recently called on the Venezuelan government to end the “terror campaign against its own citizens.” Kerry’s words are just the latest effort by the US government and mainstream media to portray the month-long protests in Venezuela as peaceful popular demonstrations against an authoritarian regime that has resorted to repression to quell the uprisings.  As a result, the Venezuelan government, as Kerry’s statement illustrates, is being blamed for most of the 28 deaths that have occurred. But is this portrayal accurate? A closer look at the reality on the ground paints a very different picture. From the beginning, the protesters have been armed, have conducted widespread arson and have been intent on achieving the unconstitutional overthrow of a democratically-elected government. Continue reading


Washington Seeks Regime Change in Venezuela

Both the ongoing protests in Venezuela and the economic problems that the demonstrators are protesting against appear to have been orchestrated by the opposition in order to destabilize the country and bring down the government. Unable to gain power through the ballot box, the Venezuelan opposition has turned to unconstitutional means to oust President Nicolas Maduro. And with only limited support among Venezuelans, the opposition has been dependent on outside aid from the United States and Colombia, Washington’s closest ally in Latin America. According to a recently discovered strategy document, the current protests appear to represent the latest tactic in a destabilization campaign that Washington has been waging against Venezuela for more than a decade, initially to overthrow former president Hugo Chávez, and now to oust his successor Maduro. Continue reading


Promoting Injustice: The Bias of Human Rights Watch

Over the past thirty years, Human Rights Watch has become one of the most recognized non-governmental organizations in the world due to its global promotion of human rights. But despite its claims to be an advocate of international human rights law, the reports issued by Human Rights Watch have exhibited a bias towards certain rights over others. More precisely, Human Rights Watch repeatedly focuses on political and civil rights while ignoring social and economic rights. As a result, it routinely judges nations throughout the world in a manner that furthers capitalist values and discredits governments seeking socialist alternatives. It is this bias that lies at the root of Human Rights Watch’s scathing attacks on Venezuela, or what the organization’s executive director Ken Roth called, “the most abusive nation” in Latin America.

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